Learn all you can about intelligence tests prior to the initial meeting with the diagnostician (evaluator). Prepare to discuss and give input into the selection of the test to facilitate the best option for your child and his/her needs. For example:

  1. If you have evidence that your child has a language related disability (speech disorder, expressive or receptive language disorder, autism, dyslexia) then you could suggest administering a nonverbal measure of intelligence.
  2. If your child has anxiety, attention deficits, or processing speed delays, you may recommend a tests that is mostly not timed.

Ultimately, the diagnostician makes the decision, but parental input is usually welcomed since you know your child better than anyone. Learn more about IQ misconceptions and how to preparing for testing.

Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-V), 2014

  • Ages 6-16.11
  • 1-2 hours to administer; FSIQ in 60 minutes
  • 13 subtests
  • Historically the most popular

Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, (SB5), 2003

  • Ages 2-85; Early SB5 2-7.3
  • 10 subtests
  • 1-2 hours to administer
  • Half of the test is nonverbal; uses manipulatives
  • Expanded IQ scale from 40-160

Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (KABC-II), 2004

  • Ages 3-18.11
  • 10 subtest, two scales
  • 1 ½ – 2 hours to administer
  • Minimizes language
  • Not ideal for gifted; low ceiling

Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (KBIT-II), 2004

  • Ages 4-90
  • 20 minutes to administer
  • Verbal and nonverbal tasks do not require spelling and reading
  • Yields verbal and non-verbal scores plus composite
  • Used more for screening than full evaluation

Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ IV), 2014

  • Ages 2-95+
  • Standard battery 1-10; Extended battery 11-20; 11 additional cognitive subtests
  • Time depends on how many subtests are administered
  • Brief Intelligence Assessment: 15 minutes; used for screening or re-evaluations

Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS-II), 2015

  • Ages 3-94
  • 6 subtests, 4 core (verbal, nonverbal, memory)
  • 30 minutes to administer
  • Minimizes speed and motor skills
  • Currently becoming most popular

Cognitive Assessment System (CAS2), 2014

  • Ages 5-18.11
  • 12 subtests, 8 basic battery
  • Tests planning and attention (simultaneous and successive)
  • 1 hour to administer
  • Used with students with ADHD

 

NONVERBAL INDIVIDUAL IQ TESTS (one-on-one)

Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT2), 2016

  • Ages 5-21
  • 6 subtest, 4 core
  • Requires no expressive or receptive language from examiner or examinee
  • 30-45 minutes to administer
  • Examiner must administer nonverbally, using mime techniques which is a little awkward for student and psychometrist
  • Minimizes language barriers

Leiter International Performance Scale (LIPS-3), 2013

  • Ages 3-73
  • Used with children with sensory or motor deficits and/or reading and language difficulties

Wechsler Nonverbal (WNV), 2006

  • All Ages
  • 4-6 subtests
  • 25-35 minutes
  • Directions may be given in pictures or orally
  • Good to use with hearing impaired

Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (TONI4), 2010

  • Ages 6-89.11
  • Directions in 7 languages
  • 15-20 minutes to administer

 

GROUP IQ TESTS (given to several students at one time)

 Otis-Lennon School Ability Test- Eighth Edition, 2019

  • Grades 1-12
  • 40-45 minutes to administer
  • All items are read to students

Naglieri Nonverbal Aptitude Test (NNAT-3), 2019

  • Grades K-12
  • 30 minutes to administer
  • Only contains matrices
  • Removes all language barriers

Raven Progressive Matrices (Ravens-2), 2018

  • Three separate tests are available for different age and ability levels: Colored Progressive Matrices, Standard Progressive Matrices and Advanced Progressive Matrices
  • Measures figural reasoning ability only