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The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has benefited college athletes for more than 100 years. Its history dates back to as far as the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt when rules for the sport and better practices were being determined for inter-collegiate football. Now, the member-led organization is an association that is “dedicated to the well-being and lifelong success of college athletes.” Today, there are more than 20 sports in which more than 460,000 NCAA student athletes compete. Many homeschool students have met the NCAA eligibility and are included in that number. They have been able to continue their high school athletic careers into college pursuing the sport they love.

There are three divisions in NCAA sports under which colleges and universities are deemed. If you have a high school student who would like to play college sports, they must complete the required core courses for NCAA eligibility during their high school years in order to be considered to play.

NOTE: ALL HomeLife Academy (HLA) students (including Florida students) are considered homeschoolers by NCAA. However, there are two homeschool forms they do not have to fill out.

1. Evidence that homeschooling was conducted in accordance with state laws (a signed written statement from the home school administrator verifying compliance with state home school legislation).

2. A signed statement of who managed the home school program (e.g., who taught and evaluated the coursework, awarded grades and issued credit).

Typically, students begin earning credit towards their NCAA eligibility in the ninth grade. Some eighth grade courses are accepted by NCAA, but we like to make sure a student has his or her core courses without using those eighth grade courses. We also discourage the fifth year senior program for NCAA students.

NCAA Get Ready. Get Set. Go!
Grade 9
•Start planning now. Take the right courses and work hard to earn the best grades possible.

•Ask your counselor for a list of your high school’s NCAA-approved core courses to make sure you take the right classes.

•Begin filling out the core course worksheets for all core courses – e-mail HLA Counselor Lani Carey for an example or blank worksheets, if needed.

Grade 10
•Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center.

•If you fall behind on courses, do not take short cuts to catch up. Ask your counselor for help with finding approved courses or programs you can take.

Grade 11
•Check with your counselor to make sure you will graduate on time with the required number of NCAA approved courses.

•Take the ACT or SAT and submit your scores to the NCAA using code 9999.

•At the end of the year, ask your counselor to send or upload your official transcript to the NCAA Eligibility Center. If you took classes at more than one high school or program, you will need to submit an official transcript for each school.

•No core course worksheet is required for college courses (ex: dual enrollment).However, the college must send an official copy of the transcript directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center.

•Make sure you are on track to graduate on time with your class.

Grade 12
•Complete your final NCAA courses as you prepare for graduation.

•Take the ACT or SAT again, if necessary, and submit your scores to the NCAA using code 9999.

•Request your final amateurism certification beginning April 1 (for fall enrollees) or October 1 (for spring enrollees) through your NCAA Eligibility Center account.

•After you graduate, ask your counselor to send or upload your final official transcript to the NCAA Eligibility Center showing proof you graduated.

•Only students on an NCAA Division I or II request list will receive a certification.

If you have additional questions regarding NCAA eligibility, contact Lani for more information.


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©2016 HomeLife Academy. Article by Jennifer Smeltser. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the publisher http://homelifeacademy.com/.